Overcoming Distorted Negative Thinking

It’s a different thing to be physically criticized, to have critics. That, in one way or the other, builds you depending on how you take criticism. However, criticizing yourself could be worse.

Imagine you criticizing yourself and bringing yourself down, telling yourself that you are impossible, that you’re worthless, etc. It’s not just criticism but it affects you negatively. You tend to lose faith and hope in yourself, then negative thinking sets in, which not only affects you but also your work, your relationship, your mind, low self-esteem, health and life.

What is Distorted Negative Thinking?


This is simply ways our mind convinces us of something that isn’t really true. These inaccurate thoughts are usually used to reinforce negative thinking or emotions — telling ourselves things that sound rational and accurate, but really only serve to keep us feeling bad about ourselves.

For instance, a person might tell themselves, “I always fail when I try to do something new; therefore, I fail at everything I try.”

Or because a person failed a particular exam, they go on and tell themselves, “Exams are not meant for people like me because I’d always fail”. This and lots more go on in their head and the worse of it all is that it doesn’t show on the face. These are physically healthy people with unhealthy minds and thoughts.

Some also go as far as formatting all the positive aspects of their lives and live the negative because that’s what they think they really are. But that’s far from the truth.

How Do You Overcome Distorted Negative Thinking?

Negative thinking, though as bad as it seems, can be overcome, but research shows that struggling with, arguing with, trying to drown out or push away unhelpful thoughts only amplifies them and makes things worse.

So how can it be overcome?

1. Use the name-it-tame-it method

When you have this bad thought on the inside, call it by the name. For instance, you had the thought of being a failure, name it and tame it: because I failed once doesn’t mean I’m a failure, it’s meant to teach me something I don’t know and the path I didn’t thread well. I’m not a failure and will never be.

2. Don’t be idle

Don’t be idle. Constantly engage yourself in mind growing things, read empowering books, talk with positive minded people, not those who laugh at you when you talk to them about yourself. Those who know the real definition of being friends: that stay with you through thick and thin, that know the value of you.

3. Stay positive

When the thought comes crawling through your head to your mind, replace it with something positive. Talk positive, think positive, react positively to people so you’re positively spoken to.

4. Work with an active mindset

Work with an active mindset, that it’s going to be well. What I’m doing will work out, it will be good, not because I’m doing it but because I know so. Talk to that negative thought and question it each time it arises, work active, work positive.

5. Nothing is perfect

Having the mindset that nothing is perfect lets you know that even when things do not go your way, it doesn’t mean it won’t be good in the long run. Everything will not always go smoothly, all you need to do is make a constant effort to make corrections where possible, learn from mistakes and gain experience.

6. Focus on the promise, not the problem

Forget about the road and remember the complements you’ve got. When you focus on the promise rather than the problem, you go a long way against negative thinking.

With all these ways, it can only be possible if you determine to overcome this negative thinking. If not, you can’t overcome it. So, with determination, you can overcome distorted negative thinking.

How do you overcome negative thinking? Feel free to share in the comments below. Also, don’t forget to subscribe to this blog to not miss a post.

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